© RAAVE 2017
THE JOINING TOGETHER OF PEOPLE WHO SHARE A COMMON INTEREST IN KEEPING AND BREEDING BIRDS

Developing a Well-bird Historical Document

Copyright Steven Frasier It is rare that a parrot owner has a written history of their parrot, let alone provided one to their Veterinarian. Most owners show-up at a Veterinarian’s office with a very Sick-bird and little else. Large parrots can live a long life. An annual visit to an avian trained Veterinarian is one way of ensuring that the parrot will have a healthy life. As part of that yearly visit (more often is strongly recommended), I recommend working with your Veterinarian in developing a detailed Medical file for your parrot. It will save precious time ‘when’ your visit is for a far more serious reason. Listed below is a guide to the information that will support your Veterinarian’s medical file. It will provide needed historical information for your parrot. By providing it in a written form, as part of a Well-bird examination, it will greatly aid in diagnosing ‘when’ you present your parrot for a Sick-bird examination. Remember, this information could be essential in aiding a quick diagnosis of your parrot. Be boldly honest and detailed with your answers, they may save your parrot’s life. Origin Where did the parrot come from? Be specific with the name of the Pet Store, Bird Store, Adoption/Rescue Center, Breeder, or individual (include address and phone numbers). Was the parrot Wild-caught, from a U.S. Breeder or not known? Was the parrot Hand-fed or Parent-raised? How old is the parrot? Provide a birth date, if known. If there is no known record, provide your best estimate (stated as an estimated age). Etc…. Known Medical History Include information, which is not in this Veterinarian’s file. Has the parrot had any previous medical problems, illnesses or prior surgeries? Has the parrot been tested for TB, Chlamydiosis or other avian diseases? Have any blood or diagnostic tests ever been performed? When? Results? DNA or surgical Sex tested. Etc…. If you have changed Veterinarians, ask your past Veterinarian(s) for a copy of your parrot’s file. Keep a complete set with your parrot’s travel kit. Specific Medical Review List those items that need to be reviewed as part of each Well-bird/Sick-bird examination, examples being a specific medical problem, illness or prior surgery. Ownership How long has this parrot been part of your family? Providing an arrival date is better then the number of months or years. List prior owners. Be as detail as possible regarding prior ownership (include names, addresses, phone numbers and dates). Is the parrot a pet or a breeder? Are there other parrots in the household? If so, how many? What kind? Known medical history of each individual parrot (if not already known by this Veterinarian). What other pets are in the household? Etc…. Lifestyle How much playtime/interaction do you (and others) spend with your parrot? How much sleep does the parrot normally get? Is the cage covered? Does the parrot bathe regularly? How often? Is the parrot confined to a cage –or- free to roam the house? Does the parrot receive regular grooming of its beak, wings, and nails? Who performs the grooming and how often? Is the parrot fully flighted? Egg laying? And if so, how often and when? Etc…. Caging Define the type and size of cage? Type of metal or other materials used in its construction? Is it painted, powder coated or bare metal? What type of cage flooring and material(s) used? Cleanliness of cage? Does the parrot chew or gnaw on the cage bars? How many perches are in or on the cage? What kind, size and material are they? How many toys are available? What kinds? Where is the cage location in house? Provide the same information on any additional cage(s) (sleeping cage, etc.), play stand(s), tee stand(s) in the house. Does your parrot share its cage with other parrots? Etc…. Diet Type of food offered? Type of food actually eaten? Is the food available all day long or part of each day? Appetite? Finicky eater? Is water available all day long or part of each day? What type of water dispenser(s)? Etc…. Your Veterinarian will maintain a weight history (in grams) as part the medical file. A weekly weight history on a low cost, postage style scale will be happy excepted by your Veterinarian and it is far better then a yearly weight or no history at all. The availability of gram scales, for home use, continues to improve and is common on many Websites. It is easy to view this level of detail as over-kill. However, the time spent developing it now will assure it being far more accurate then your guessing at details during a Sick-bird Veterinarian visit. The combination of an extensive medical file and the historical information (developed here) will provide a solid medical file for your parrot. Sources: The Complete Pet Bird Owner’s Handbook (New Edition), Gary A. Gallerstein D.V.M www.exoticpetvet.net and www.avianweb.com
Reno Area Avian Enthusiasts The joining together of people who share a common interest in keeping and breeding birds
© RAAVE 2017
Reno Area Avian Enthusiasts The joining together of people who share a common interest in keeping and breeding birds
THE JOINING TOGETHER OF PEOPLE WHO SHARE A COMMON INTEREST IN KEEPING AND BREEDING BIRDS

Developing a Well-bird Historical Document

Copyright Steven Frasier It is rare that a parrot owner has a written history of their parrot, let alone provided one to their Veterinarian. Most owners show-up at a Veterinarian’s office with a very Sick-bird and little else. Large parrots can live a long life. An annual visit to an avian trained Veterinarian is one way of ensuring that the parrot will have a healthy life. As part of that yearly visit (more often is strongly recommended), I recommend working with your Veterinarian in developing a detailed Medical file for your parrot. It will save precious time ‘when’ your visit is for a far more serious reason. Listed below is a guide to the information that will support your Veterinarian’s medical file. It will provide needed historical information for your parrot. By providing it in a written form, as part of a Well-bird examination, it will greatly aid in diagnosing ‘when’ you present your parrot for a Sick-bird examination. Remember, this information could be essential in aiding a quick diagnosis of your parrot. Be boldly honest and detailed with your answers, they may save your parrot’s life. Origin Where did the parrot come from? Be specific with the name of the Pet Store, Bird Store, Adoption/Rescue Center, Breeder, or individual (include address and phone numbers). Was the parrot Wild-caught, from a U.S. Breeder or not known? Was the parrot Hand-fed or Parent-raised? How old is the parrot? Provide a birth date, if known. If there is no known record, provide your best estimate (stated as an estimated age). Etc…. Known Medical History Include information, which is not in this Veterinarian’s file. Has the parrot had any previous medical problems, illnesses or prior surgeries? Has the parrot been tested for TB, Chlamydiosis or other avian diseases? Have any blood or diagnostic tests ever been performed? When? Results? DNA or surgical Sex tested. Etc…. If you have changed Veterinarians, ask your past Veterinarian(s) for a copy of your parrot’s file. Keep a complete set with your parrot’s travel kit. Specific Medical Review List those items that need to be reviewed as part of each Well-bird/Sick-bird examination, examples being a specific medical problem, illness or prior surgery. Ownership How long has this parrot been part of your family? Providing an arrival date is better then the number of months or years. List prior owners. Be as detail as possible regarding prior ownership (include names, addresses, phone numbers and dates). Is the parrot a pet or a breeder? Are there other parrots in the household? If so, how many? What kind? Known medical history of each individual parrot (if not already known by this Veterinarian). What other pets are in the household? Etc…. Lifestyle How much playtime/interaction do you (and others) spend with your parrot? How much sleep does the parrot normally get? Is the cage covered? Does the parrot bathe regularly? How often? Is the parrot confined to a cage –or- free to roam the house? Does the parrot receive regular grooming of its beak, wings, and nails? Who performs the grooming and how often? Is the parrot fully flighted? Egg laying? And if so, how often and when? Etc…. Caging Define the type and size of cage? Type of metal or other materials used in its construction? Is it painted, powder coated or bare metal? What type of cage flooring and material(s) used? Cleanliness of cage? Does the parrot chew or gnaw on the cage bars? How many perches are in or on the cage? What kind, size and material are they? How many toys are available? What kinds? Where is the cage location in house? Provide the same information on any additional cage(s) (sleeping cage, etc.), play stand(s), tee stand(s) in the house. Does your parrot share its cage with other parrots? Etc…. Diet Type of food offered? Type of food actually eaten? Is the food available all day long or part of each day? Appetite? Finicky eater? Is water available all day long or part of each day? What type of water dispenser(s)? Etc…. Your Veterinarian will maintain a weight history (in grams) as part the medical file. A weekly weight history on a low cost, postage style scale will be happy excepted by your Veterinarian and it is far better then a yearly weight or no history at all. The availability of gram scales, for home use, continues to improve and is common on many Websites. It is easy to view this level of detail as over-kill. However, the time spent developing it now will assure it being far more accurate then your guessing at details during a Sick-bird Veterinarian visit. The combination of an extensive medical file and the historical information (developed here) will provide a solid medical file for your parrot. Sources: The Complete Pet Bird Owner’s Handbook (New Edition), Gary A. Gallerstein D.V.M www.exoticpetvet.net and www.avianweb.com